Posts Tagged ‘Easterns’

Namibia v Easterns, Sunday 8th February 2015, 10am

March 9, 2015

1 - opening shot

Whilst the scheduling of football in Africa leaves a lot to be desired with frequent venue and timing changes, cricket is far more reliable. If a game is listed as taking place then it generally does unless, as everywhere, the weather intervenes.

With that in mind I was pleased to see that our stay in Windhoek coincided with a fifty over provincial game between Namibia and the South African side, Easterns. It’s a little odd to see a country competing with regional sides but I suppose it’s similar to Scotland taking part in the one day competitions against the English counties.

As we left our hotel we spotted a couple of Himba kids in the car park. It seems that the market where their mothers flash their jugs is a seven days a week affair. I’d seen the kids in the shopping centre the previous day, wandering around barefoot and wearing nothing more than a string around the waist. I dare say at the ages of three or four they wouldn’t be too bothered about it, but I suspect that they might become a little more self-conscious as they got older.

Himba kids.

Himba kids.

The Wanderers stadium was easy enough to find and after having our car searched we made our way in and parked just behind the scoreboard. I looked the place up on the internet and an England XI had played a couple of one day games against Namibia there in 2004. The first of them being Kevin Pieterson‘s debut for an English representative side.

Play should have started at half past nine, but whilst the players were all milling around, the game had yet to begin. The only action was provided by a kid in a Barcelona away strip using a cricket net as a football goal. Those shirts get everywhere.

Barca kid.

Barca kid.

Jen and I took seats in the shade in front of a bar. As play started we were joined  by two couples, each consisting of a woman reading a magazine and a man compiling his own scorecard. One of the fellas got so infuriated by the inaccuracy of the scoreboard that he left his seat and altered it himself.

There was also a woman sat by herself with an early morning lager. “I love cricket” she told us as she lit another Chesterfield.

View from our seats.

View from our seats.

She wasn’t the only one starting early as there were a handful of people in the bar watching a T20 game on the telly. I imagine the main benefit of being indoors was the air-conditioning.

We’d been to an Easterns game a couple of weeks earlier and in an equally empty venue had sat near to their wicketkeeper‘s Mam. She wasn’t there for this game but I still kept an eye out for her boy, hoping that he’d do okay.

View from the other side.

View from the other side.

We couldn’t stay all day as we had a football game with a noon kick-off to get to, but we watched the first twenty overs or so, Namibia getting to around seventy for two by the time we left them to it.

 

 

Easterns v Free State, Sunday 25th January 2015, 9.30am

February 20, 2015

1-opening shot

I’d been meaning to get to Willowmoore Park for a while and the opportunity cropped up when a Sunday morning departure from the farm we’d being staying at meant that we could pop along and see the second innings of a one day provincial game between Easterns and Free State.

It had been a fairly poor weekend for wildlife. The last time we’d stayed at Kohande we’d stalked baboons through the woods. This time though we had to be content with a few assorted boks. They are okay, but a poor consolation when you know that there are monkeys around.

Big horned bok.

Big horned bok.

Benoni turned out to be a bleak place, or at least it did on a gray Sunday with shop shutters down, rubbish blowing along the street and everyone else having somewhere better to be. We found Willowmoore Park easily enough and had our pick of the car park spaces. If we’d wanted we could have taken any of the spots reserved for the big bosses of South African cricket.

The car park wasn’t the only place with plenty of space and with the exception of the players balcony we had the choice of just about any seat in the ground. We settled for the President’s Suite which we shared with the only other inhabitant, the Easterns wicketkeeper’s mother. Maybe she was also the President, but if she was she hadn’t made use of her parking space.

View from the President's Suite

View from the President’s Suite

Easterns fifty over score of two hundred and seventeen for seven didn’t look to be too taxing a target for Free State. If anything was going to scupper their efforts then it was probably going to be the weather. I left Jen and Mrs Bula in the seats outside of the President’s Suite and took the opportunity to have a look around whilst I could.

At the far end of the ground there were another three or four pitches, with games taking place on two of them. These were more traditional efforts with the players in whites and some even wearing the sort of cap that I haven’t seen since my cub scout days.

Just like the olden days

Just like the olden days

When the rain began falling we relocated to the main stand. It probably has a name but I haven’t bothered looking for it. It’s old though, probably the oldest part of the ground, although at some point plastic seats had been added to it. There were a couple of members of the ground staff and a player’s girlfriend sat towards the back, but apart from them we had it to ourselves.

Denis Compton scored three hundred at this ground on an MCC tour in 1948. It only took him a minute over three hours and ended up as his highest first class score. I tried to imagine how the surroundings would have looked then and assumed that the main stand would have been there, without the seats, but not much elsewhere around the perimeter. There would maybe have been a wooden scorers box and board and, I suspect, a lot more spectators.

The old stand.

The old stand.

The rain got heavier and further play became unlikely. We waited for an hour an a half but realistically nothing else apart from the odd inspection was going to happen. The Free State score of sixty two for three off twelve overs wasn’t enough to allow a result and so the match was abandoned.